Tag Archives: Leviticus

Leviticus 9–11: Confidently entering God’s presence with reverence

Because of God’s grace, we can enter God’s presence “boldly” because the perfection of Yeshua the Mashiakh (Jesus the Christ) has covered our “uncleanness.” The distinction between “clean” and “unclean” is powerfully presented by the tragic events of Leviticus 9-10 and the parable of allowable foods in Leviticus 11.

The Torah reading שּׁמיני Shemini (“eighth,” Leviticus 9–11) illustrates the pervasive problem of being internally “unclean” and approaching God presumptuously while so. Yeshua warned against that in the parable of the wedding garment and the recorded confrontation over paying Roman taxes (Matt. 22:2–21).

Continue reading Leviticus 9–11: Confidently entering God’s presence with reverence

Leviticus 1:1–6:7: Getting back into the LORD’s presence

“One thing I have asked from the LORD, that I shall seek: That I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, To behold the beauty of the LORD And to meditate in His temple.” (Psalms 27:4 NASB)

Ever been homesick? Or finally woken up to the reality, “There’s no place like home!” The Torah reading ויקרא Vayiqra/Vayikra (“and he called,” Leviticus 1:1–6:7) flows from the end of the second book of the Pentateuch (Exodus 40:35), which ends with the exclusion of Moshe and everyone else from God’s Presence in the newly dedicated Tabernacle. The third book of the Pentateuch gives us God’s instructions for how we return to His Presence.

The entire book of Leviticus, called Vayiqra in Hebrew, teaches that true worship is not about entering a building but entering God’s Presence every day of our lives.

Continue reading Leviticus 1:1–6:7: Getting back into the LORD’s presence

Leviticus 27: How to do something special for God

Richard AgeeThe vows discussed in Leviticus 27 are voluntary and extraordinary, beyond what is required, to be dedicated to service in the Tabernacle. This is how you can do more than what is required, if you feel lead to do so. The type of vow described here is similar to a monastic vow, in which someone promises to serve God in His temple for an extended period, or even for one’s entire life.

Continue reading Leviticus 27: How to do something special for God