Tag Archives: Leviticus

Recap of major themes in the book of Leviticus

The book of Leviticus is not written in chronological order but in thematic order. God may also repeat a point several times as an emphasis on that particular point.
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Leviticus 26-27 — God mixes justice with mercy

The topic of these two chapters is God’s anger: the just anger that comes when His people do not follow the way He has laid out for them. God reveals the blessings He will give them if they obey Him and give their hearts to Him and the curses that will come upon them they disobey Him by running towards other gods.
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Leviticus 25 — Shabbat and jubilee years

Keeping the jubilee year with both crops and servants were an act of faith on the part of the people of Israel. It is difficult to live in freedom of liberty and it is so easy to fall into bondage and slavery. God set up a safety net to protect the people from permanent bondage and slavery and to protect the land from being over consumed and dried up.

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Leviticus 23-24 — ‘Feasts to the LORD’; ‘the LORD spoke to…’

The 23rd chapter of Leviticus is a relatively obvious passage. The explanations are simple and self-explanatory, except for questions about the biblical timing of Firstfruits and Pentecost.

The 24th chapter is a bit unusual and not so simple to decipher. When you read the book of Leviticus and you find the phrase “the LORD spoke to…” pay attention to whom is supposed to hear the message. There were some messages for the sons of Aaron but some messages were for the people of Israel. Each group had their own duties and responsibilities, and it’s God Himself Who decides.

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Leviticus 21-22 — George Washington’s vision at Valley Forge and God’s approach to sanctification

These two chapters of Leviticus and the vision George Washington had at Valley Forge have some interesting connections.

George Washington was at the end of his rope figuratively speaking as he and his men arrived at Valley Forge. No food, no supplies and strongly questioning his calling, George Washington was truly a desperate man. However, just as he was considering giving up on his venture and sending his soldiers away, he received a vision of the country he was striving to create. He was given his purpose back. He had a calling to be head and shoulders above other men in his conduct as he fought to free the colonies from British rule.

The book of Leviticus also gives a vision, an understanding of how a priest is supposed to conduct himself and why the priesthood were supposed to conduct themselves more carefully than their brethren as they worked to bring the people closer to God.

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Leviticus 19-20 — God teaches Israel how to be holy

Up to this point, most of Leviticus has described how the Levites were to serve God. Starting at this point, we now start to learn how God wants the people to serve him.

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Leviticus 17-18 — prohibitions against eating blood and perversion

The wording in this series of chapters differs from prior chapters. At this point, HaShem (the LORD) is addressing all the people, not just the priesthood.  There is an intriguing link between the elaborations on not eating blood in chapter 17 and then those on not having sexual relations with blood and close relatives in chapter 18.

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