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Parashat Eikev/Ekev (עקב): Deuteronomy 7:12-11:25

Studies in Torah

Some have disregarded Israel at the time of Yeshua the Messiah (Jesus the Christ) ministry and in modern times as having anything to do with Bible prophecy, because of perceived failings of the people in trusting God. But as we see in this week’s Torah reading — עקב Ekev or Eikev (“consequence”), Deut. 7:12-11:25 — God is faithful to His promises. We should be grateful for God’s mercy and bigger plans for our lives.

Parashat Va’etchanan (ואתחנן): Deuteronomy 3:23-7:11

Studies in Torah

Yeshua the Messiah (Jesus the Christ) said several times during the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 5-7, “You’ve heard it said … but I tell you ….” Many of the corrections He provided to what God originally intended were similar to the lengthy explanation of the Ten Commandments by Moshe (Moses) in Deuteronomy. This week’s Torah reading, Va’etchanan (“and I pleaded,” Deut. 3:23-7:11), includes the beginning of Moshe’s elucidation.

Parashat Devarim (דברים): Deuteronomy 1:1–3:22

Studies in Torah

The roller-coaster ride of ancient Israel through trust in the LORD, apathy and rebellion mirrors our the turmoil that swirls around our daily lives. This week’s Torah reading, Devarim (“words,” Deut. 1:1-3:22), starts a “second telling,” or deuteronomy, to the post-Exodus generation of why Israel exists and what its mission is.

Parashot Matot/Massei (מטות/מסעי): Numbers 30–36

Studies in Torah

“As God is my witness, I will do that.” Such words can roll off our tongues easily, but we can forget that One is witnessing such a vow and watching to see whether we respect the Creator enough to follow through. That’s why Moshe (Moses), Yeshua haMashiakh (Jesus the Christ) and His apostle Ya’akob (James) warned us against dragging the LORD in to co-sign on our promises. The wisdom of being very careful in making promises and seeking the strength to keep them is the subtext of the Torah reading Matot, Numbers 30–32. Our journey from our old life is much like Israel’s journey from bondage in Mitsraim to freedom at Sinai and rest in the Promised Land, a trek recounted for the second generation in the Torah passage Massei, Numbers 33–36.

Parashat Massei (מסעי): Numbers 33–36

Studies in Torah

When life or our trust in the LORD seems to get too tough for too long, it’s tempting to give up. Yet we should look back on how far we have come in our new life in the Kingdom of Heaven through the mercy given us on the name of Yeshua haMashiakh (Jesus the Christ). Our journey from our old life is much like Israel’s journey from bondage in Mitsraim (Egypt) to freedom at Sinai and rest in the Promised Land, a trek recounted for the second generation in the Torah passage (parashah) Massei (“journeys of”).

Parashat Matot (מטות): Numbers 30–32

Studies in Torah

“As God is my witness, I will do that.” Such words can roll off our tongues easily, but we can forget that One is witnessing such a vow and watching to see whether we respect the Creator enough to follow through. That’s why Moshe (Moses), Yeshua haMashiakh (Jesus the Christ) and His apostle Ya’akob (James) warned us against dragging the LORD in to co-sign on our promises. Yisrael’s promise to remain faithful to the One Who delivered the people out of bondage in Mitsraim (Egypt) eroded under the temptation of a flesh-friendly religion. So a former ally of 40 years ago became an existential enemy and had to be defeated. The wisdom of being very careful in making promises and seeking the strength to keep them is the subtext of the Torah reading Matot (“tribes”), covering Numbers 30–32.

Parashat Pinchas (פינחס): Numbers 25:10-30:1

Studies in Torah

Adultery is seen as no big deal in today’s society. Consider, though, how the hurt person in the relationship feels. That’s why Israel’s running after false gods and treating YHWH with contempt or apathy is compared to adultery many times in Scripture. This kind of unfaithfulness and rebuilding of the relationship between Creator and created is the subtext of this passage — Pinchas (“Phinehas”).