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Parashat Ki Tavo (כי תבוא): Deuteronomy 26:1–29:8

Studies in Torah

“Correcting” an aggressive driver on the road. “Losing it” with a screaming child in the store. We may think we’re far removed from the horror show described in this week’s Torah reading, Ki Tavo (“when you come in,” Deut. 26:1–29:8), but each of us encounters stress that pushes off any mask over our true characters. A key point in this passage is entering and living in the “rest” God gives us, fully realized through the Messiah and the Spirit. Like Israel’s move from Mitsraim (Egypt) to the Land, our entering God’s “rest” (Hebrews 3–4) is all about a change of identity, purpose and character.

Parashat Ki Tetze (כי תצא): Deuteronomy 21:10-25:19

Studies in Torah

Murder, adultery, theft, honesty and lust for people and stuff: The Torah passage Ki Tetze (“when you go forth,” Deut. 21:10-25:19) explains what’s under the hood of the Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth commandments.

Parashat Shoftim (שפטים): Deuteronomy 16:18-21:9

Studies in Torah

Shadows of the prophet status and crucifixion of the Messiah appear in the Torah passage Shoftim (“judges,” Deut. 16:18-21:9). In a section of the Bible focused on codes of justice still used in modern society, there also is hope for the greatest mercy the world has ever seen, in Yeshua haMashiakh (Jesus the Christ).

Parashat Re’eh (ראה): Deuteronomy 11:26-16:17

Studies in Torah

Common advice in this world is, “Follow your heart.” But in the Torah reading Re’eh (“see,” Deut. 11:26-16:17), we learn that God wants to transform our way of thinking, so our desires will take us in a wiser direction. This section explains the reborn heart approach to the Second, Third and Fourth commandments on blasphemy, idolatry and stopping what we’re doing to remember the rest God gives us.

Parashat Eikev/Ekev (עקב): Deuteronomy 7:12-11:25

Studies in Torah

Some have disregarded Israel at the time of Yeshua the Messiah (Jesus the Christ) ministry and in modern times as having anything to do with Bible prophecy, because of perceived failings of the people in trusting God. But as we see in this week’s Torah reading — עקב Ekev or Eikev (“consequence”), Deut. 7:12-11:25 — God is faithful to His promises. We should be grateful for God’s mercy and bigger plans for our lives.

Parashat Va’etchanan (ואתחנן): Deuteronomy 3:23-7:11

Studies in Torah

Yeshua the Messiah (Jesus the Christ) said several times during the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 5-7, “You’ve heard it said … but I tell you ….” Many of the corrections He provided to what God originally intended were similar to the lengthy explanation of the Ten Commandments by Moshe (Moses) in Deuteronomy. This week’s Torah reading, Va’etchanan (“and I pleaded,” Deut. 3:23-7:11), includes the beginning of Moshe’s elucidation.

Parashat Devarim (דברים): Deuteronomy 1:1–3:22

Studies in Torah

The roller-coaster ride of ancient Israel through trust in the LORD, apathy and rebellion mirrors our the turmoil that swirls around our daily lives. This week’s Torah reading, Devarim (“words,” Deut. 1:1-3:22), starts a “second telling,” or deuteronomy, to the post-Exodus generation of why Israel exists and what its mission is.