Tag Archives: pharaoh

Exodus 14:1–15:21: Seventh day of Unleavened Bread teaches repentance, salvation and righteousness

The seventh day of Chag Matzot (Feast of Unleavened Bread) is a memorial to the crossing of the Red Sea. It’s not only the zenith of most movies about Israel’s flight from Egypt but also a parable about every believer’s path to repentance, salvation and righteousness.

Mankind can only serve one master: God or sin. We can’t serve both. God purchased all of Israel with the death of the first born to serve Him. God owns all of Israel. God is not only teaching Israel a lesson but Egypt as well. When God covered the children of Israel with the cloud and then sent them through the sea, this was a form of baptism.

Repentance is something that happens on the inside, the water is a physical representation of that repentance. Repentance doesn’t pay for your sins. Repentance is merely step 1 of our walk with God. It clears the conscience so salvation can enter. Step 2 is filling one’s life, so “Egypt” will never return.

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Exodus 9-10: Plagues of locusts, darkness, death of first-born against Mitsraim

Richard AgeeThe plague against the firstborn seems harsh because the innocent died because of the faults of the leadership of Mitsraim (Egypt). However, like with the life of Yosef (Joseph), that plague is a foreshadowing of the future death of an innocent First-born, Yeshua the Messiah.

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Exodus 1-2: Moshe arises as the fulfillment of God’s promise

Richard AgeeTry your best to ignore the cartoons and movies that purport to tell the account of Moshe (Moses). They take many liberties with the real record, imposing their own story lines on him. Important elements at the beginning of the book of שְׁמוֹת Shem’ot, also called Exodus, are God’s faithfulness to the promise made to Abraham that his descendants would face hardship but become a numerous people and blessing to the nations.

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Genesis 47-48: Ya’akob moves to Goshen; Yosef takes control via the famine; Yisra’el blesses Ephraim & Manasseh

Richard AgeeYa’akob (Jacob) blessed pharaoh of Mitsraim (Egypt) upon arrival there. Ya’akob blessed the sons of Yosef (Joseph), Ephraim and Manasseh, as if they were his own elder sons. As we have noticed in past studies of the account of Yosef in Genesis, there are parallels between the roles of pharaoh, Yosef and Yisra’el (Israel), f.k.a. Ya’akob, and those of the Father, the Son and a people called Yisra’el.

Continue reading Genesis 47-48: Ya’akob moves to Goshen; Yosef takes control via the famine; Yisra’el blesses Ephraim & Manasseh

Genesis 45: Yosef reveals his secret to his brothers

Richard AgeeWe see here that God caused and allowed many bad things to Yosef for the salvation of Yosef’s family, but He caused and allowed even worse things to happen to the Messiah Yeshua for our salvation.

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Genesis 41, part 2: Messianic connection between pharaoh and Yosef

Richard AgeeMessianic figures in the Bible aren’t one-to-one representations of the Messiah, but the messianic figures of the pharaoh of Mitsraim (Egypt) and Yosef (Joseph) do give us a glimpse of the relationship between the Father and the Messiah.

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Genesis 41, part 1: Yosef foretells of seven famine years in Mitsraim

Richard AgeeYosef (Joseph) rose quickly from forgotten prisoner to second in command of Mitsraim (Egypt), all over two strange visions Pharaoh had of fat and famished cows then plump and withered heads of grain. Behind all this we see the Creator’s hand at work, teaching Pharaoh, Mitsraim and us about where we should put our trust.

Continue reading Genesis 41, part 1: Yosef foretells of seven famine years in Mitsraim