Tag Archives: Gospel of Matthew

Receiving judgment: Learning from the struggles God sends

There was a small group from another region who called me a few months ago. The person kept asking for advice. After several phone calls, I told this person that God would now put a test on your group. When He is finished, you will have a great loss. I knew then that this would happen to Hallel Fellowship too.

That is what has transpired. I have looked back and asked God why? How did it happen? Did the Devil do it? No, the Devil is feeble and weak. The Devil only has the authority that God gives him. God can and does protect us from the Evil One.

What is it that God has in mind? For the past couple of weeks, I have been deeply meditating, asking God over and over what to do. I have sought God’s wisdom and understanding and yet something is missing.

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Matthew 26:1-16: Anointing of Yeshua for burial

JeffWe pause before studying Yeshua’s Passover meal with the 12 to consider an account (Mt. 26:1–16; Mk. 14:1–11; Jn. 12:1–11; Lk. 7:36–50) so important that Yeshua said it must be recounted wherever the good news of the Kingdom of God and the role of God’s Mashiakh (Messiah) in healing the gulf between mankind and God is proclaimed. 

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Luke 21:5-38: When will the sun, moon, stars darken and Son of Man arrive on a cloud?

JeffWe don’t want the Day of the LORD to arrive because of its sadly necessary turmoil, yet we hope for it. The main occupants of the heavens — sun, moon and stars — are going to appear dim and dark. It’s almost the reverse of Genesis 1.

This is not going to be a good time. Yet it’s dead and hope, wrapped in one.

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Demystifying the mysterious ‘abomination of desolation’

JeffOne of the ways we can look at the mysterious apocalyptic phrase “abomination of desolation” is to see it as a “Tale of Three Cities” — Babylon, Tyre and Ninevah — and how all three cities are really symbolic of Yerushalayim (Jerusalem) herself. The carnage of the “abomination of desolation” will not come on Babylon, Tyre, Ninevah or any of our great cities of modern times like London, New York or Tokyo. From God’s prophets, we understand that it was and will be the people of Yerushalayim who will have a front row seat, and it will be for the same reasons for the previous desolations.

George Santayana said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” We are blessed to read these repeated warning of the spiritual condition of people God calls before an “abomination of desolation” — and internalize the lessons. 

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Luke 19:45-48: Yeshua relays prophecies that God’s ‘house of prayer’ would become a ‘den of robbers’

JeffYeshua’s excited anger at the leaders of the Temple in Luke 19:45-48 (cf. Matt. 21:10–17; Mk. 11:11–18; Jn. 2:13–25) came with quotations from prophets Yeshayahu (Isaiah) — “My house will be house of prayer for all nations” (Isa. 56:7) — and Yirmeyahu (Jeremiah) – “den of robbers” (Jer. 7:11). The full context of those prophecies directly relates to why the leaders should have understood why Yeshua was quoting from those passages and why those prophecies applied to them.

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Luke 17:20-37: The Scandalous Verses, part 2: Israel must purge its pride and put it upon the Messiah

JeffMany look to the apocalyptic Matthew 24, also touched on in Luke 17:20-37, for signs of the “end times.” But the context in both books — Luke 15:1–17:19; chapter 18 and Matthew 23 and 25 — suggests the real message is a call for Israel to purge itself of pride in anything other than God and offload that rebellion upon the Messiah.

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Why did Yeshua quote ‘blessed is he who comes in the name of the LORD’ from Psalm 118?

Richard AgeeSukkot day 3 — The annual seven-day festival of Tabernacles, סֻכּוֹת Sukkot in Hebrew, is the feast all about the final, great ingathering of people into the Kingdom of God.

In the modern world we are living in, there are certain things that Messiah said that are targeted to us and our time.

Continue reading Why did Yeshua quote ‘blessed is he who comes in the name of the LORD’ from Psalm 118?