Tag Archives: Exodus

Exodus 14:1–15:21: Seventh day of Unleavened Bread teaches repentance, salvation and righteousness

The seventh day of Chag Matzot (Feast of Unleavened Bread) is a memorial to the crossing of the Red Sea. It’s not only the zenith of most movies about Israel’s flight from Egypt but also a parable about every believer’s path to repentance, salvation and righteousness.

Mankind can only serve one master: God or sin. We can’t serve both. God purchased all of Israel with the death of the first born to serve Him. God owns all of Israel. God is not only teaching Israel a lesson but Egypt as well. When God covered the children of Israel with the cloud and then sent them through the sea, this was a form of baptism.

Repentance is something that happens on the inside, the water is a physical representation of that repentance. Repentance doesn’t pay for your sins. Repentance is merely step 1 of our walk with God. It clears the conscience so salvation can enter. Step 2 is filling one’s life, so “Egypt” will never return.

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Parashat Vayakhel/Pekudei (ויקהל/פקודי): Exodus 35:1–40:38

Are we paying attention how we’re building a home for Yeshua and the Spirit in our lives? The care and attention to detail that went into the Tabernacle that the LORD instructed Israel to build and what that teaches about the Holy One and Heaven’s plan to transform us is central to the lessons in the Torah reading ויקהל/פקודי Vayakhel/Pekudei, covering Exodus 35:1–40:38.

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Exodus 30:11–34:35: You are not ‘just a number’ to God

How are we made holy or “set apart”?  Our good deeds or the good deeds of an illustrious ancestor? It isn’t by genealogy, John the Baptist made that clear. He counts us among His people when we answer God’s call upon our heart and actions through Messiah Yeshua. The foundation for that holiness through the Messiah is put down in Torah reading כי תשא Ki Tisa (“when you take,” Exodus 30:11–34:35).

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Parashat Ki Tisa (כי תשא): Exodus 30:11-34:35

This week’s Torah reading is called כי תשא Ki Tisa (“when you take”), covering Ex. 30:11–34:35. The Torah reading shows us how Messiah Yeshua represents His people before His Father as Aharon walks through the sacrifices and prayers on the Day of Atonement.

We also see Messiah Yeshua in Moshe’s response to the sinful spectacle with the Golden Calf. Moshe’s simple confession of Israel’s sin to the Lord and his willingness to pay the price himself are all echoes of our Messiah Yeshua’s heart. God rejected Moshe’s profound offer of atonement because He has already prepared for Messiah Yeshua to make the atonement Moshe wanted to make for Israel.
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Parashat Tetzaveh (תצוה): Exodus 27:20-30:10

“For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.” (Hebrews 4:15 ESV)

What does is mean that Yeshua is our “high priest”? We can learn a lot about that role from the inauguration of the first high priest of the people of God, described in detail in this week’s Torah reading, תצוה Tetzaveh (“you shall command”), covering Exodus 27:20-30:10.

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Parashat Terumah (תרומה): Exodus 25:1–27:19

“And see that you make them after the pattern for them, which is being shown you on the mountain.” (Exodus 25:40 ESV)

What’s so important about the meticulous detail in the instructions for the Tabernacle? These pictures are like the résumé for the Mashiakh, the Christ. This week’s Torah reading, תרומה Terumah (“heave offering”), covering Ex. 25:1-27:19, foreshadows the work of Yeshua.

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Parshat Mishpatim (משפטים): Exodus 21:1–24:18

Yeshua the Mashiakh told us the two greatest commandments were to love God unreservedly and to love other people unselfishly (Matt. 22:34–40; Mark 12:28–31; Deut. 6:4–6; Lev. 19:18). Learning what the LORD would do in a situation — to walk as He walked (1Jn. 2:6) — is at the heart of this week’s Torah reading מִּשְׁפָּטִים Mishpatim (“judgements,” Ex. 21:1-24:18).

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