Category Archives: Anger

Numbers 30–36: ‘Be angry, and yet do not sin’

“And Moses said to them, ‘Have you spared all the women? Behold, these caused the sons of Israel, through the counsel of Balaam, to trespass against the LORD in the matter of Peor, so the plague was among the congregation of the LORD. Now therefore, kill every male among the little ones, and kill every woman who has known man intimately.’” (Numbers 31:15–17 NASB)

God killed 24,000 Israelite men for their debauchery with these women. These women were willing tools in Midian and Moab’s efforts to seduce the people of Israel into idolatry. This is why they were killed.

The men of Midian used their wives to seduce the Israelites. In the dual Torah readings מטות Matot and מסעי Massei, we learn that Midian did this under the belief that they had to conquer Israel for their own long-term survival, for the sake of their sons. Hence when God tells Israel to wipe out the men, wives and young boys, he is telling them to wipe out the people complicit in Israel’s idolatry and also the reason for which they excused their idolatry.

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Real meaning of “Eye for an Eye”: God’s lessons in peace-making

JeffLast time, we discussed lashon ha-ra (evil tongue, i.e., gossip, slander and divisiveness) and how it is one of the latter-day plagues among God’s people. 

In this excursus, we will explore a related principle taught in Torah by Yeshua and His apostles: proportionality. A number of Christians often consider “eye for an eye and tooth for tooth” an example of the “old covenant” not to live by anymore and cite one Yeshua’s supposed “six antitheses” — Matt. 5:38-39 — as proof that Yeshua did away with “eye for an eye” altogether. And cultural knowledge of Bible phrases has made this understanding common, even cliché.

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Lassoing lashon ha-ra (evil tongue): Grappling with gossip and slander in God’s family

JeffWe’re taking an excursus from our exploration of Yeshua’s “apocalyptic discourse” in Matthew 24-25, Luke 21 and Mark 13 to explore one of the most pervasive sins among God’s people today. It’s not the Sabbath. It’s not sexual deviance. This is a study about kosher — distinguishing between “clean” and “unclean” — and God’s judgment on the Day of the Lord.

Continue reading Lassoing lashon ha-ra (evil tongue): Grappling with gossip and slander in God’s family

Forgiveness: God’s requirements to forgive others

Forgiveness is not a difficult biblical topic to understand. However, because humans are creatures of emotion, forgiveness becomes more complex in its application. It plays out in may angles and levels and groupings: the need to forgive others, forgive ourselves and even forgive God. In seeking resolution to even a modest offense, it can involve the offender, the offended, God (if the parties are believers) and third parties — families friends, pastors, the church, mediators, attorneys and even the police.

Not all who call themselves Christians will be among the “first fruits” unless they learn the discipline of forgiveness.

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Acts 8 — vengeance, bitterness & forgiveness; Israel & Messiah Inc.

The rebuke of Simon the Magician highlights how bitterness and resentment lead to wickedness. Yet how is vengeance a part of forgiveness and personal peace? As Acts 8 ends, the Ethiopian official asks what is now a 2,000-year-old question, Can prophecies about Israel apply to Messiah? Continue reading Acts 8 — vengeance, bitterness & forgiveness; Israel & Messiah Inc.

Sukkot: Anger Without Sin

Feast of Tabernacles — Day 2

David De Fever, coordinator of Hallel Fellowship, passes along what he’s learned about managing his anger and helping other believers in God to do likewise. He talks about the roots of anger, how it is expressed and answers audience questions about specific manifestations of anger in our lives. Continue reading Sukkot: Anger Without Sin

Sukkot: Controlling Anger

David De FeverDavid De Fever, coordinator of Hallel Fellowship, passes along what he’s learned about managing his anger and helping other believers in God to do likewise. He talks about the roots of anger, how it is expressed and answers audience questions about specific manifestations of anger in our lives.  Continue reading Sukkot: Controlling Anger